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Stent Induced Veno-colic Fistula

  • Yi-Fan Huang
    Correspondence
    Corresponding author. Division of Cardiovascular Surgery, Department of Surgery, Tri-Service General Hospital, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan.
    Affiliations
    Division of Cardiovascular Surgery, Department of Surgery, Tri-Service General Hospital, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan

    Division of Cardiovascular Surgery, Department of Surgery, Tri-Service General Hospital Songshan branch, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan
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  • Yi-Ting Tsai
    Correspondence
    Corresponding author.
    Affiliations
    Division of Cardiovascular Surgery, Department of Surgery, Tri-Service General Hospital, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan
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Open ArchivePublished:May 09, 2019DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ejvs.2019.03.030
      Image 1
      A 49 year old female developed left leg swelling after salpingo-oophorectomy 18 months previously; venography showed stenosis of the entire left external iliac vein and one 16 × 90 mm WALLSTENT® Endoprosthesis (Boston Scientific, Natick, MA, USA) was implanted. Ten months later she presented again with severe bloody stools. Computed tomographic venography showed free air around the stent (A). Free air around the left external iliac vein where the stent was implanted is shown by arrow in panel (A). Colonoscopy revealed a fistula between the sigmoid colon and the left external iliac vein with venous stent exposure (B). Sequential necrosis of both walls caused the veno-colonic fistula. Removal of stent and colostomy were performed. One year later, the patient is well.

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